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How to Set Up Your Own Customized Monitors for mySAP.com Solutions

by Christoph Nake | SAPinsider

April 1, 2002

by Christoph Nake, SAP AG SAPinsider - 2002 (Volume 3), April (Issue 2)
 

The Computing Center Management System (CCMS) monitoring infrastructure is one of SAP’s main monitoring data sources, one that has been continuously improved since its introduction back in SAP R/3 4.0. Now, in these times of heterogeneous and complex system landscape scenarios, almost all SAP solutions — and, increasingly, the analysis and management functions of third-party products — are integrated into the CCMS infrastructure, either via the recently released SAP Solution Manager or the tried-and-true CCMS Alert Monitor (transaction RZ20).1

But what if you want to develop your own customized monitors to meet the specific needs of your system? You can — right from within the CCMS Alert Monitor.

Transaction RZ20 is the expert tool SAP provides for monitoring data analysis based on the CCMS monitoring infrastructure. It offers preconfigured monitor sets and monitors for various parts of the local SAP system. The preconfigured monitors in RZ20 are examples of how monitoring information can be displayed, which you can also use to build your own collection of personalized monitors.

Each RZ20 monitor is designed to serve a specific purpose. The “CCMS monitor sets” in Figure 1 are SAP’s predefined set of CCMS monitors, each containing a collection of monitors for specific functions. The individual monitors within each set are ready-to-use fixed templates that give you different views of the same data. From these, you can set up your own customized performance monitors for a clear view of selected key performance indicators (KPIs) in several SAP systems.

Figure 1 The CCMS Alert Monitor RZ20

The aim of this article is to outline the four key steps for setting up a new performance monitor. These steps can easily be transferred to other monitoring purposes, as well. While this article doesn’t cover all the finer points, it gives you a taste of what is possible, and points you to resources you’ll need when creating your own monitors (see “Resources for Creating Your Own Customized Monitors” at the end of the article).

Step 1: Tap Into Your Central Monitoring System (CEN)

The central monitoring system (CEN) is included in the CCMS monitoring infrastructure, and is the part of your SAP system that monitors your system landscape. This system requires high availability and should be running at least SAP R/3 4.6B.

You only need to register the centrally monitored SAP systems once with the CEN, using transaction RZ21. Before you set up monitors for the system landscape, SAP recommends that you first register the remote systems.

For a detailed description of registering a remote SAP system, see the SAP online documentation for CCMS at http://help.sap.com under “SAP Online Documentation for SAP Web Application Server 6.10.” 2

Step 2: Choose Your Most Important KPIs

The aim is to set up a monitor that shows the KPIs of your SAP systems. You first have to decide which monitoring information is important to you and should be displayed in the new monitor. To keep the structure of the monitor clear and the data transfer from the remote systems to the CEN small, only the most important indicators should be included in the monitor.

Figure 2 shows a sample of selected KPIs, grouped by the main areas of an SAP system.3

Area KPI
Dialog processing Components of the average response time, including frontend influences
Response time of critical business transactions
Buffers Hit ratio and swap rates of all important buffers
Memory management Use of the SAP extended memory, roll, and page area
Operating system CPU utilization and operating system paging rates
CPU resource consumption of the SAP and the database processes
Database Hit ratios of the data and the database dictionary cache
Expensive SQL statements
Figure 2 Sample Proposal for Basis Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

Step 3: Make Sure the Delivered Monitoring Information Fits the KPIs

After deciding on your high-priority KPIs, you will need to determine whether this information is available in the CCMS monitoring infrastructure. The information provided by the CCMS monitoring infrastructure depends on your SAP release and database.

How do you know what monitoring information is available? Use RZ20, and go to the SAP monitor set “SAP CCMS Technical Expert Monitors.” Under this, check the monitor System -->All Monitoring Segments -->All Monitoring Contexts. This monitor shows all of the CCMS alert monitoring information available for your system.

A description of the monitoring information delivered by SAP’s CCMS group can be found in the SAP Service Marketplace (listed at the end of this article).

Figure 3 is an example of which monitoring tree elements (MTEs) fit the KPIs determined in Step 2. The example is based on SAP Release 4.6C with a Microsoft SQL Server database.

Area KPI MTE
Dialog processing Components of the average response time, including frontend influences FrontendResponseTime
ResponseTime
QueueTime
Load+GenTime
DBRequestTime
UsersLoggedIn
Response time of critical business transactions See SAP Note 308048.*
Buffers Hit ratio and swap rates of all important buffers HitRatio (program buffer)
Swap (program buffer)
Memory management Use of the SAP extended memory, roll, and page area R3RollUsed
R3PagingUsed
EsAct (extended memory)
HeapAct (local private memory)
Operating system CPU utilization and operating system paging rates CPU_Utilization
Page_In (NT based OS)
Page_Out (Unix based OS)
State (SAPOsCol)
CPU resource consumption of the SAP and the database processes See SAP Note 451166.*
Database Hit ratios of the data and the database dictionary cache Data Hit Ratio (MSSQL)
Procedure Hit Ratio (MSSQL)
Expensive SQL statements Longest execution time (MSSsQL)

* Monitoring of critical business transactions and single operating system processes is not active by default, because each customer has different requirements. These SAP Notes describe, in detail, how the activation is performed.

Figure 3 Matching Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) to CCMS Monitoring Tree Elements (MTEs)

Step 4: Set Up the New Monitor

Now, based on the monitor set you’ve just listed, you can create your own monitors using the CCMS Alert Monitor (RZ20). You can set up two types of monitors using transaction RZ20: static and rule-based monitors. Here’s how you determine which type of monitor you need:

Static Monitors
This type of monitor is appropriate for small and stable system landscapes, such as a standard three-tier system landscape. From the RZ20 maintenance screen “Generate monitor design,” you simply make your selections by marking the checkbox next to each MTE. Figure 4 shows some examples of our selections. The resulting monitor based on these selections is also shown.

Figure 4 Setting Up a Static Monitor

As you can see, static monitors are easy to set up. But you can also see that this method could have drawbacks if you have lots of MTEs to choose. So if the system landscape is very large, this approach is not recommended, due to the sheer number of MTEs that you would have to select.

Another potential drawback is that a new SAP system is introduced into the system landscape, you would probably need to go back and manually adapt the monitor to display information related to the new system. The other option, rule-based monitors, gives the system the ability to automatically adjust your monitors for these situations.

Rule-Based Monitors
This type of monitor is appropriate for very large system landscapes. Using predefined CCMS rules, you enter information about what should be displayed. These rules automatically process multiple MTEs for the registered systems of your choice.

For instance, rule CCMS_GET_MTE_ BY_CLASS processes all MTEs specified by the parameter MTEClass for all registered systems specified by R3System. The result is a monitor that shows the dialog KPIs for all registered systems (see Figure 5).

Figure 5 Setting Up a Rule-Based Monitor

The SAP Online Documentation, available via http://help.sap.com,4 describes in detail how static and rule-based monitors are set up.

An example of a typical complete performance monitor is shown in Figure 6. It contains all of the performance indicators that were chosen for this particular SAP system. In the case of a Microsoft SQL Server, the monitor provides information about expensive SQL statements. The rule-based structure shows data from three SAP systems (T70, T71, and W70). If a new remote SAP system is registered centrally, the monitor is automatically updated. Therefore, an administrator has a quick and detailed view of the system, and in the case of a performance bottleneck, can locate the cause immediately.

Figure 6 An Example of a Final, Complete Performance Monitor

Some Possibilities for Customizing the CCMS Performance Monitor

Here are just some of the ways you could customize the monitor and the CCMS monitoring infrastructure to fit your needs:

  • Add agents: CCMS agent technology is available to expand the CCMS monitoring infrastructure (for example, by allowing the inclusion of non-Basis components, such as ITS) and to speed up data delivery from remote systems. For more information, see my article in the January-March 2002 SAP Insider.5

  • Activate transaction-specific monitoring: It is possible to include performance data for transactions that are crucial for your business in the performance monitor. SAP Note 308048 describes how this can be activated.

  • Incorporate monitors for resource consumption: Displaying this type of information about the SAP system and the database could help you avoid hardware bottlenecks. SAP Note 451166 explains how to activate operating system process monitoring using SAPOsCol.6

Resources for Creating Your Own Customized Monitors

To get started, you can download the complete structure of the performance monitor presented in this article from http://service.sap.com/systemmanagement.

You can also gather detailed instructions from these resources:

  • The SAP Service Marketplace at http://service.sap.com/systemmanagement. Choose System Monitoring and Alert Management and then see Centralized System Monitoring with mySAP Technology and CCMS Agents: Features, Installation and Usage. Release 4.6C documentation, which can be helpful to any CCMS user, is also available here under Computing System Management Documentation.

  • Documentation for the CCMS at http://help.sap.com. Under SAP Online Documentation for SAP Web Application Server 6.10, choose SAP Library --> SAP Web Application Server --> Computing Center Management System and open the chapter Computing Center Management System. Although this is Release 6.10 documentation, Release 4.6x documentation follows a similar path.

  • SAP Notes 308048 and 451166.

  • “Bring Enhanced Central Monitoring to Your SAP System with Free, New CCMS Agent Technology” in the January-March 2002 SAP Insider, which is also available in the Article Archives.

To take these concepts even further, look for future SAP Insider articles that will deal with the customizing of thresholds and methods of the CCMS monitoring infrastructure.


1 For more on the basics of the CCMS monitoring infrastructure, see my article “Bring Enhanced Central Monitoring to Your SAP System with Free, New CCMS Agent Technology” in the January-March 2002 issue of SAP Insider, or in the Article Archives.

2 Choose SAP Library --> SAP Web Application Server --> Computing Center Management System and open the chapter Computing Center Management System. From here, go to Monitoring in the CCMS -->The Alert Monitor --> Alerts -->Monitoring Multiple SAP R/3 Systems.

3 The description given here is in accordance with SAP R/3 Performance Optimization: The Official SAP Guide by Thomas Schneider (ISBN: 0782125638).

4 Use the search term “Rule based monitor.”

5 “Bring Enhanced Central Monitoring to Your SAP System with Free, New CCMS Agent Technology” from the January-March 2002 issue is also available online in the Article Archives.

6 SAPOsCol is a standalone program included as part of each SAP installation.



Dr. Christoph J. Nake joined SAP AG in 1996. Since then, he has had a great deal of experience in basis administration and system management. Christoph now works in Product Management of the mySAP Server Technology Group with a focus on the CCMS Alert Monitoring Infrastructure. You can reach him at ccms@sap.com.

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